News

Apple updates MacBook Air

Apple announced two new Macbook Airs on Wednesday—and they’re way more than speed-bumps. Think of them instead as a cross between the last-generation of the company’s ultra-thin laptop and the iPad.

“We think it’s the future of notebooks,” Apple CEO Steve Jobs told the audience at the company’s Back to the Mac press event.

Continue reading

Advertisements
Standard
News

Apple releases iLife ’11

Apple on Wednesday unveiled iLife ’11 at its Back to the Mac event in Cupertino, demoing three of the suite’s updated applications—iPhoto, iMovie, and Garageband. Features showcased included a new, iOS-like full-screen mode for iPhoto, redone audio editing and trailer templates in iMovie, in addition to revamped recording and teaching tools for GarageBand. The updated suite was released Wednesday and will cost $49. It will also come preinstalled on all new Macs.In a lengthy demo that consumed nearly half of Wednesday’s press event, Apple CEO Steve Jobs was joined by Senior Vice President Phil Schiller, Randy Ubillos, chief architect for the company’s video applications, and Xander Soren, GarageBand’s product marketing manager, who each took one of the suite’s flagship programs to demonstrate. Continue reading

Standard
News

New Adobe Reader sandboxed, simplified

Adobe has launched the new version of its Reader PDF viewing software, and with it comes a number of changes: a new Roman-based numbering scheme (“Adobe Reader X”), tightened security and, for the browser version, a substantially reduced user interface. Adobe’s flagship PDF creation software, Adobe Acrobat, has been upgraded as well.

“PDF is used everywhere, and what we want to do is make sure we have the best tool for consuming and interacting with PDFs,” said Rick Brown, Adobe’s senior product director for Acrobat.

As the company executives have hinted, Reader X will feature a sandbox to limit the access that PDF-based scripts can have over the user’s operating system, reducing the attack surface that PDFs typically provide. PDF readers have been increasingly used by malicious hackers as a platform from which to launch attacks. Continue reading

Standard
Feature

The Art Of Film Title Design

Have you ever thought of what makes you remember a certain movie or TV show? Of course, it’s the story being told, you’ll say. But what about movies such as Goldfinger, Seven and Snatch? What’s the first thing that comes to mind? We are pretty sure their opening title sequences stick out for many of you.

Today we’ll take a closer look at that short space of time between the moment the lights go down and the first scene of a film, the part that so often sets our expectations of a movie, that sequence that speaks to our creative side: the art of the film title. We’ll look at the evolution of title design and some particularly interesting titles from various periods in the history of cinema and animation.

Film titles can be great fun. In them we see the bond between the art of filmmaking and graphic design — and perhaps visual culture as a whole. They have always served a greater purpose than themselves: to move the overarching story forward. Whether you are a motion graphic designer, a digital artist or a connoisseur of design, we hope you are inspired by these film titles and the ideas they suggest to your own creative endeavors. At the end of this post, you’ll find a listing of relevant typefaces and Web resources.

Read the full article

Standard
Feature

Lessons for next time. Where Gap went wrong.

Written by Sydney-based designer, Clinton Duncan.

What an exciting life the new Gap logo led. It snuck up on us, as if to pleasantly surprise us. Next, it got to experience the heady cut and thrust if the online design world via blogs and Twitter, where it gained multiple personalities and impersonators. It went viral, virtually became a meme, shot to fame, was widely reported on, made it tomainstream media and then, all of a sudden, it died. Snuffed out, not by a newer, younger model – but the old model it was meant to replace.

So, where to start with this debacle? Basically this boils down to three clear failures. A failure in sourcing the right consultant, a launch failure, and a failure of belief. While significant, these three failures were only the fuel, and the Internets simply brought the matches. Plenty of them. Branding programs are never perfect, and even the most imperfect births can still lead to strong, healthy brands. Following are three examples of brands that got one of the three parts wrong, yet still survived. Whether they are successful brands or not, well you can be the judge on that one… Continue reading

Standard
News

“Back to the Mac.” New Mac OS event on Oct. 20

If you thought that Apple’s only cares have been about its shiny iOS devices, well, Cupertino’s prepared to prove you wrong. On Wednesday, the company issued invites to the press for an event on Apple campus next week on Wednesday, October 20. Dubbed “Back to the Mac,” the invite’s image shows a slightly rotated Apple logo with a lion peeking through it. In the invite, Apple says “come see what’s new for the Mac…” and adds that it will present a preview of the next major version of Mac OS X—which I think we can now safely presume is Mac OS X 10.7 Lion. The company will also be providing a café breakfast and a coffee bar—isn’t that nice of them? The event kicks off at 10 a.m. Pacific next Wednesday, and Macworld will, as always, be providing live, blow-by-blow coverage of Apple’s latest announcements.

Standard