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Paintings or Photographs?

The guys over at Gizmodo have compiled a list of amazing hyperrealistic paintings that can easily pass off as photographs. 

Rub your eyes all you want, but these images are actual paintings created by really talented artists. 

Click here to view the full list of paintings. 

 
Raphaella Spence: Empire State. 2012, oil on canvas 

 
Hubert De Lartigue: Sushi. 2010, acrylic on canvas 

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Renaissance Portraits Re-Imagined As Realistic Photographs

Award-winning photographer Mark Abouzeid has re-imagined paintings from the Renaissance era photo-realistically, giving us a new perspective from which to view art from the past.

Turning the flat dimensions of the old paintings into fascinating images with life-like features and details, Abouzeid has “defined a new direction for photography using the past to redefine the present and inspire the future”.

View more of his work from the “The New New World” series below and check out more of his brilliant creations on his website.

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Unraveling The Logic Behind Logos

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The Sirens in Greek mythology were dangerously devious creatures similar to mermaids that lured sailors close to shore to be shipwrecked.

They also sparked Starbucks’  twin-tailed mermaid logo that is now renowned across the globe, helping to attract millions of people to the high-end coffee shop daily and devouring them with the café’s ambiance.

Logos are the heart, mind and soul of a company’s brand. For the lucky ones, whether it’s a word, color, picture or phrase (think Nike’s “Just Do It”), the logo might even be an emotional token to the customer, evoking a heightened sense of brand loyalty.

That’s one reason why customers often respond with initial rejection, perhaps even outcry, when companies undergo major logo changes. In some cases, like Tropicana, the backlash can be so overwhelming it prompts the company to revert back to its old ways.

“Whenever there’s a new logo rollout half the people freak out,” said Steve Douglas, founder of Logo Factory.

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Google Launches Sixth Annual Doodle Design Competition for Kids

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Google launched on Monday its sixth annual Google Doodle competition, encouraging young students to design their own Google logo for the search engine giant’s homepage.

Starting today, the program — Doodle 4 Google — is calling for submissions from students in Kindergarten through grade 12. Google said a panel of celebrity judges and a public vote will be factored into the decision. The top winner will take home a $30,000 scholarship, while the student’s school will receive a $50,000 technology grant.

This year’s theme is “my best day ever,” which aims to give kids a chance to “explore themes that could be imaginary, exploratory or even sentimental, past, present or future,” Google said.

The winning doodle from each of the 50 U.S. states will go on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City from May 22 to July 14.

Last year, more than 114,000 doodles were submitted for the theme of “If I could travel in time, I’d visit…” A drawing from Wisconsin-based Dylan Hoffman, age 7, that portrayed a pirate looking for treasure on an island came in first place.

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